Buduruwagala

Buduruwagala is an ancient Buddhist temple with the largest of the standing Buddha statue with 16 m from head to toe; it is the most giant standing Buddha of the island. The seven statues are dated back to the 10th century.⁣ Do not expect any golding, paintings or other decorations. This place breathes history and simplicity. I felt tiny with massive respect for the work which has been done. ⁣The quality of the carvings is imposing. ⁣⁣

Info

Buduruwagala can be reached from Wellawaya. The last 4 km are located on the dirt track, a set of lakes, home to peacocks and herons. It is likely to reach any vehicles. Be aware. The road is narrow and tricky to avoid other a bit bigger car. It is on the main highway Colombo-Galle-Hambantota-Wellawaya.

I paid 1000 Rps from the Bus station in Wellawaya to Buduruwagala and back. Be careful not to be cheated; the tuk-tuk drivers will ask more.

There are not many shops around, so I suggest you bring snacks and water with you.
Before entering the area where there are rock sculptures, there is a parking place for which you do not pay.
To walk up the few steps, you must remove your shoes.

the rock of Buddhist Sculptures

Individual entrance 368 Rps.
To hire a guide + 500 Rps.
2019/2

In the middle, the central Buddha, on the left-hand side of rock stands a group of three figures. The central one, which preserves it is white paint, is one of the essential Mahayana gods, Avalokaitesvara. To the left stands the servant, while the female figure to the right posture is Tara, his companion. On the right is the Tibetan Bodhisattva Vajrapani. The central character is Maitreya or Natha, the future Buddha, while the third figure is the god Vishnu.

This is not the entrance.
The way to the statues.

“I was visiting waterfalls nearby and was walking back to the nearest city when a car with one lovely family stopped to ask me if I wanted to take a ride. I was glad for the opportunity because I just missed a bus. It was an enjoyable experience since we were talking, kids were playing, and that is how I popped up in Wellawaya.”

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